US Flew Bombers Over Korean Peninsula Late Tuesday, South Korea Says

Marsha Scott
October 12, 2017

The European Union on Tuesday strengthened measures on North Korea over missile tests, banning natural gas sales and imports of textiles.

Two US B-1 bombers carried out a training exercise today with Japanese and South Korean military aircraft in the vicinity of the Sea of Japan, the US military said, amid growing tension over North Korea's missile and nuclear programs.

President Trump hosted a discussion on options to respond to any North Korean aggression, or, if necessary, to prevent Pyongyang from threatening the United States and its allies with nuclear weapons, the White House said in a statement.

At the end of last month, North Korea's foreign minister Ri Yong-ho said that the USA had "declared war" on the authoritarian state and was "right" to shoot down American planes.

However, the South Korean defence ministry has refused to comment about this allegation.

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The South Korean military said this was part of a regular exercise to bolster military defences and also to display the alliance between the United States and South Korea.

U.S. B-1 bomber, center, flies over Osan Air Base with USA jets in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016. Pyongyang belatedly responded by relocating some of its military aircraft to its east coast, the National Intelligence Service then said. South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff say the bombers flew from Anderson Air Force base in Guam and entered the Korean Air Defense Identification Zone at around 8:50 p.m.

A pre-emptive strike against Pyongyang's leadership would be hard to undertake, but it's widely seen as the most realistic of the limited military options Seoul has to deny a nuclear attack from its rival. Given that set of circumstances, the Kim regime would likely chose to use its nuclear weapons. Kim is the third generation of his family to rule North Korea. While early 80 percent of the documents had not yet been identified, they reportedly included contingency plans for South Korean special forces and information on military facilities and power plants, it said.

There is no evidence that the attacks were successful, and cybersecurity experts believe that North Korea lacks the ability to disrupt the power grid.

Other reports by MaliBehiribAe

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