New Facebook Anti Revenge Porn Tool Wants Users To Upload Their Nudes

Audrey Hill
November 9, 2017

At least that is what Facebook and the Australian government is saying to do in a new test aimed at cutting off potential revenge porn before it happens.

According to Tech Crunch, "The strategy entails uploading your nude photos or videos to Messenger in order to help Facebook tag it as non-consensual explicit media".

So if a relationship goes sour, you could take proactive steps to prevent any intimate images in possession of your former love interest from being shared widely on Facebook or Instagram.

During the trial, those anxious about their images being posted as revenge porn have to contact Australia's e-Safety commissioner through an online form, which may then suggest providing them to Facebook.

Revenge porn in becoming an increasing problem but Facebook are doing all they can to stamp it out.

For people who have sent nude photos of themselves, there are risks that the images could fall into the wrong hands, whether that's by a malicious hacker gaining access to your device, or an ex-partner using the images as an exercise in online humiliation.

"We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly", Ms Inman Grant said.

More news: SSE and Innogy in talks to merge United Kingdom retail energy supply businesses
More news: Bug Stops Some iPhone Uses from Typing 'I'
More news: A Miami fan slapped a police officer - and he punched her back

Having proven itself capable of taking out Russian agents, Facebook is now rolling out a plan it promises will stop revenge porn.

The social networking giant is trialling the feature in Australia, asking users to send in naked photos of themselves via Messenger that could be uploaded by someone without the owner's consent.

Two years ago, Twitter and Reddit cracked down on revenge porn, banning the practice on both platforms.

If someone tries to upload explicit content matching that hash on platforms such as Facebook, Messenger, and Instagram, the company won't allow it.

Facebook won't store the image, just the digital fingerprint. The trial is due to spread to the UK, US and Canada.

Facebook will store the pictures on its secure servers for a short period of time, so it can ensure it's enforcing the policy correctly, reports the Guardian. Once that's done, every photo like that one will be unable to be uploaded to Facebook.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", Julie explains.

Other reports by MaliBehiribAe

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER