Trump on North Korea crisis: I'd never call Kim 'short and fat'

Marsha Scott
November 13, 2017

Donald Trump sarcastically responded to North Korea's insults that described him as a "destroyer" who "begged for nuclear war" during his tour of Asia. The post came in response to the country's foreign ministry calling Trump "an old lunatic" over his speech in South Korea.

It comes on the same day Rodong Sinmun, the regime-run newspaper, warned the North would "surely win in the showdown" with the US and South Korea. Oh well, I try so hard to be his friend - and maybe someday that will happen! Trump has denied that his campaign coordinated in any way with Moscow during last year's presidential campaign, and he said Saturday that Russian President Vladimir Putin again denied any involvement in trying to influence the USA elections when Trump spoke with him at a regional summit in Danang, Vietnam.

On Aug. 8, Trump threatened the regime with "fire and fury like the world has never seen", leading Kim to say he would consider sending missiles into the waters off the coast of Guam in "mid-August".

Kim's regime has continued to carry out nuclear and ballistic missile tests despite widespread worldwide condemnation and a series of crippling sanctions aimed at strangling the state's cash sources.

North Korean officials described Trump's trip as "nothing but a business trip by a warmonger to enrich the monopolies of the USA defense industry".

It's a continuation in the ongoing war of words, even as the regime's missile test have noticeably paused - a surprising development given that North Korea has often followed these verbal spars with threats and missile tests.

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President Trump and the leader of North Korea, Kim Jong un, have traded insults publicly, with the latest juvenile interaction suggesting that a mutually acceptable solution to North Korea's nuclear weapons programme is still some way off.

Trump attempted a symbolic stare-down of Kim this week at the heavily fortified border that separates North and South Korea, but heavy fog forced the cancellation of his plans.

The Trump administration has said all military options remain on the table when dealing with the North Korean threat, but top US officials have consistently emphasized the U.S.is pursuing a diplomatically led effort, including additional economic pressure.

Addressing a press conference later, Trump declared his belief that it was possible for the two leaders to be "friends".

He said he asked the Russian leader if he interfered in the 2016 United States election and received assurances from Mr Putin that he "absolutely did not meddle".

Other reports by MaliBehiribAe

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