Severed Rattlesnake Head Bites Texas Man

Marsha Scott
June 8, 2018

A Texas man is recovering after a rattlesnake he decapitated bit him as he tried to dispose of its body.

On May 27, Jeremy Sutcliffe and his wife Jennifer were doing yard work at their home near Lake Corpus Christi in southern Texas.

Leslie Boyer, antivenom doctor and Founding Director of the University of Arizona VIPER Institute, told Gizmodo that people should not assume that severing the head of a snake renders them harmless.

According to the station, the man immediately began having seizures, lost his vision and began experiencing internal bleeding.

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And no matter how many times you've seen some roo head do it in a Hollywood movie, don't attempt to suck the venom from the wound. Instead, the Oklahoma State Department of Health recommends getting a description of the snake and its markings.

Mrs Sutcliffe was working in a flower bed when she discovered a four-foot-long Western diamondback rattlesnake.

After narrowly avoiding death, the man is now in recovery, but his kidney function is still weak. Dr. Michael Halpert, a trauma surgeon at Christus Spohn Shoreline Hospital, said although dying from a snakebite is rare, it happens. After a 2014 incident in China, biologists affirmed that removing the head of a venomous snake doesn't instantly eliminate the threat it poses. "He was saying stuff like 'if I die I love you, '" she said. A snake bite victim is usually administered two to four doses of the expensive antidote but Sutcliffe's husband was given a whopping 26 doses, she said. Biologists warn that most bites from venomous snakes occur when people try to neutralize the snake by killing it, rather than simply leaving it alone.

Even after being severed, rattlesnakes can still bite.

Other reports by MaliBehiribAe

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